Fewer Distinctions

Art, writing, beauty, music, philosophy, fashion, commerce:
A cultural ticker tape by Andrew Lipsky
Life can be good.  ♥ Andrew

Life can be good.   Andrew

Carmen Kass in a Chanel suit and knit tank, and with a Chanel bag, in the December 2002 US Vogue, photographed by Steven Meisel

Carmen Kass in a Chanel suit and knit tank, and with a Chanel bag, in the December 2002 US Vogue, photographed by Steven Meisel

On Wednesday, August 13, 2014, Taylor Swift made an appearance on Jimmy Fallon’s “The Tonight Show” in which, in a skit alongside an outlandishly dressed Jimmy, she played a consummate dork named Natalie appearing as a guest on her friend’s tv show, “Ew!”, filmed in the friend’s basement. 
Here is an excerpt from their conversation:
Taylor Swift: “Well, my name’s Natalie and I’m 13 and I like to eat apricots and I have a band-aid collection.”
Jimmy Fallon: “Ew! What do you do for fun?”
"Taylor Swift: "Uh, sometimes I like to spend a lot of time building popsicle stick castles by myself sometimes."
—-
Though I am not familiar with Ms. Swift’s music, I think it is worth noting what good humor it is for a woman of Ms. Swift’s vast commercial success and critical acclaim, with pop-cultural ubiquity for her beauty, fashion taste, and romantic associations that parallel that earned by her music, to portray herself in good fun in a laughably unflattering light. 
In the same way that someone with all the money in the world need never once mention his wealth, someone with Ms. Swift’s considerable gifts can make light of her beauty, her grace, and her good taste.  In “The Manchurian Candidate”, Richard Condon wrote, “any attitude of power must always be accompanied by something that makes the privilege of power pardonable”.  In an age when talentless hacks routinely have you believe they summer on Mount Olympus, it is as uncommon as it is refreshing for someone so widely esteemed to show such comic humility and endear herself to a public in a way that red carpets and glossy covers cannot.   

On Wednesday, August 13, 2014, Taylor Swift made an appearance on Jimmy Fallon’s “The Tonight Show” in which, in a skit alongside an outlandishly dressed Jimmy, she played a consummate dork named Natalie appearing as a guest on her friend’s tv show, “Ew!”, filmed in the friend’s basement. 

Here is an excerpt from their conversation:

Taylor Swift: “Well, my name’s Natalie and I’m 13 and I like to eat apricots and I have a band-aid collection.”

Jimmy Fallon: “Ew! What do you do for fun?”

"Taylor Swift: "Uh, sometimes I like to spend a lot of time building popsicle stick castles by myself sometimes."

—-

Though I am not familiar with Ms. Swift’s music, I think it is worth noting what good humor it is for a woman of Ms. Swift’s vast commercial success and critical acclaim, with pop-cultural ubiquity for her beauty, fashion taste, and romantic associations that parallel that earned by her music, to portray herself in good fun in a laughably unflattering light.

In the same way that someone with all the money in the world need never once mention his wealth, someone with Ms. Swift’s considerable gifts can make light of her beauty, her grace, and her good taste.  In “The Manchurian Candidate”, Richard Condon wrote, “any attitude of power must always be accompanied by something that makes the privilege of power pardonable”.  In an age when talentless hacks routinely have you believe they summer on Mount Olympus, it is as uncommon as it is refreshing for someone so widely esteemed to show such comic humility and endear herself to a public in a way that red carpets and glossy covers cannot.   

Cindy Crawford in the January 1990 US Harper’s Bazaar, photographed by Phillip Dixon

Cindy Crawford in the January 1990 US Harper’s Bazaar, photographed by Phillip Dixon

Cindy Crawford in the June 1989 US Harper’s Bazaar, photographed by Matthew Rolston

Cindy Crawford in the October 1987 Vogue Paris, with hair by Frederic Fekkai, and photographed by Patrick Demarchelier 

Cindy Crawford in the June/July 1989 Vogue Paris, photographed by Andrew Macpherson

Cindy Crawford in the June/July 1989 Vogue Paris, photographed by Andrew Macpherson

Cindy Crawford in the June/July 1989 Vogue Paris, photographed by Andrew Macpherson

Trish Goff in the September 1995 US Marie Claire, photographed by Regan Cameron

Trish Goff in the September 1995 US Marie Claire, photographed by Regan Cameron

Shalom Harlow in the September 1994 Vogue Paris, styled by Carine Roitfeld and photographed by Mario Testino 

Shalom Harlow in the September 1994 Vogue Paris, styled by Carine Roitfeld and photographed by Mario Testino 

Helena Christensen in the August 1993 UK Marie Claire, photographed by Jacques Olivar

Helena Christensen in the August 1993 UK Marie Claire, photographed by Jacques Olivar

Claudia Schiffer in the January 1991 Vogue Germany, photographed by Neil Kirk

Claudia Schiffer in the January 1991 Vogue Germany, photographed by Neil Kirk

Christy Turlington in the May 1992 Vogue Paris, photographed by Paolo Roversi

Christy Turlington in the May 1992 Vogue Paris, photographed by Paolo Roversi

Amber Valletta in the December 1994 Vogue Paris, photographed by Craig McDean

Amber Valletta in the December 1994 Vogue Paris, photographed by Craig McDean

Bridget Hall in the September 1994 US Marie Claire, photographed by Jacques Olivar

Bridget Hall in the September 1994 US Marie Claire, photographed by Jacques Olivar